• Send to a friend
  • Print

Beauregards

Bourgogne wine, Chablis Premier Cru appellation - Beauregards

Chablis Premier Cru Left Bank. Principal Climat.
Les Beauregards benefits from a lovely view, hence the name. Locally, there are numerous names of lieux-dits that have the same meaning, such as Belle Vue or even Beauvais.

  

Beauroy

Bourgogne wine, Chablis Premier Cru appellation - Beauroy

Chablis Premier Cru Left Bank. Principal Climat.
Beauroy was previously spelled “Bosroy” or “Boroy”, and has many possible origins. It could come from a corruption of the words “bois roy” (the king's wood or the wood belonging to one named Roy). But this area has been deforested since the 12th century.
The name could also come from a corruption of “vau roy”, (valley of the king or Roy's valley). Another hypothesis is that it stems from “beauvoy” (beautiful view), substituting the “R” with a “V”. It could also come from “belle voie” (beautiful route), as there is a large path passing nearby, again with the “R” substituted by a “V”. Or even “beau bois” (beautiful wood), since there are many examples of similar names.
However, the most likely explanation is based on a text from 1568, in which one can read “clymat de beau rouard”, “beau” (beautiful) combined with the family name Rouard. Indeed, there were families called Rouard or Roard in the region at the time.

  

Berdiot

Bourgogne wine, Chablis Premier Cru appellation - Berdiot

Chablis Premier Cru Right Bank. Principal Climat.
Once pronounced “Beurdiot”, this name could have several origins. In the Oïl language formerly spoken across northern France, “beur” (hut or cabin) could refer to constructions near the fountain that used to irrigate the nearby meadows, and which when deformed might have given “beur d’eau”, then “Berdiot”. “Burche” in the local patois refers to a hedge, which is another possible root. But the most plausible origin is the word “beurdôlée” (steeply-sloping land), according to a regional dictionary. Moreover, the verb “beurdôler” means “to roll down a slope”. In local parlance, the “eau” at the end was pronounced with an extra “I” in it, in the same way as people would say “un sieau d’ieau” for “un seau d’eau” (a bucket of water).

  

Beugnons

Bourgogne wine, Chablis Premier Cru appellation - Beugnons

Chablis Premier Cru Left Bank.
Beugnons was spelled “Bignon” and “Buignon” during the Middle Ages, and may have its origins in the great clearances. “Bugna”, “bignon” and “buignon” are all Gallic words to describe standing or uprooted tree trunks.
Le Bugnon was also the ancient name for the spring. On a map dating from 1706 of the various properties of Pontigny Abbey, there is a spring flowing alongside the “path from Chablis to Saint-Bry”. It is still there, and is now called La Source des Minots. The Gallic origins of the word “source” are the most likely explanation. 

  

Blanchot

Bourgogne wine, Chablis Grand Cru appellation - Blanchot

Chablis Grand Cru
In 1537, this Climat was called Couste de Blanchot from the Germanic word “blank”, no doubt from the rocky nature of the soil made up from white limestone and pale colored limestone-clay subsoil.

  

Bougros

Bourgogne wine, Chablis Grand Cru appellation - Bougros

Chablis Grand Cru
In 1429, this plot is mentioned in a document as Boguereau. It was also spelled “Bouguerot” and “Boquerau” in 1537.
Formerly pronounced “Bougueriot”, the name of this lieu-dit could be explained by its geographical situation: it may come from the Latin “bucca” which gave the Old French “bouque” (shrunken). The nearby River Serein takes a narrow passage that was often flooded in the past. For this reason, the path leading from Chablis to the village of Maligny climbed up past La Pierreuse, just before Boquereau, which took its name from “bouque-eau” (narrow passage by the water). Or it could have its origins in the word “bois” (wood), through the word “bosk”, suggested by the form “boquereau”.