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Vaugiraut

Bourgogne wine, Chablis Premier Cru appellation - Vaugiraut

Chablis Premier Cru Left Bank.
Vaugiraut was written “Vaul Girault” in 1537 and no doubt stems from a local owner named Giraut, and means “Giraut's Valley”. 

  

 

 

Vaulorent

Bourgogne wine, Chablis Premier Cru appellation - Vaulorent

Chablis Premier Cru Right Bank.
Spelled “Vauz Loranz” in 1267, and “Vallée de Vaulorens” in 1537, this name comes from a landowner by the name of Laurent: “la vallée au Laurent” (Laurent's valley). It should be noted that the name Vaulorent has never figured on any land registry. 

  

 

Vaupulent

Bourgogne wine, Chablis Premier Cru appellation - Vaupulent

Chablis Premier Cru Right Bank.
Vaupulent was written “Vaupulan” in 1560. The Old French words of “pole” and “pule” (people or crowds) gave rise to the words “pulluler” (proliferate), “populaire” (popular) and “populace” (populace). So Vaupulent may be the name of a valley that belonged to several owners. Another possibility is from the words “purlent” and “pulent”, used to describe wild animals that gave off powerful smells. Badgers and weasels may have dug their sets and burrows in the bottom of this valley. Or the name could come from a wild shrub with an unpleasant smell, such as common dogwood, which used to grow here. Otherwise “pulent” could suggest another unpleasant root, as this old word comes from the Latin “putidus” used to describe undersized or stunted vegetation. 

  

Vaux Ragons

Bourgogne wine, Chablis Premier Cru appellation - Vaux Ragons

Chablis Premier Cru Left Bank.
In the plural, because several small valleys end up here, the name "Vaux Ragons" could come from a family called Ragon who used to live in Beines, the neighboring village, and who used to own several properties.

  

Vosgros

Bourgogne wine, Chablis Premier Cru appellation - Vosgros

Chablis Premier Cru Left Bank. Principal Climat.
Pronounced “Vogros” or “Vosgros”, Vosgros is written “V-O-S” rather than “V-A-U” like many lieux-dits in the region. This is maybe because the name does not come from the valley, rather from the “grosse voie” (big path) separating the two sides of this valley: the valley of the big path. But we cannot be sure of this because over time, the original “VAU” may have become corrupted into “VOS”. Therefore, as is usually the case, the valley theory takes precedent: “grande vallée”, “grosse vallée” and then “vaugrosse”, giving “Vosgros”.
So these two explanations should be considered with caution because the valley is fairly short and the path not so wide and the main road in this area used to run a little further to the south. Because the valley is steep-sided, the name could also be a corruption of “vaucros” (steep valley. Another possibility is that a family called Gros owned land in this valley: “la vallée à Gros” (Gros’ valley).